The Homosexuality Debate—Visiting Romans 1:24-27

There are those who, not knowing Scripture, do not believe it condemns homosexuality.1 There are also those who know well what Scripture says, yet simply choose not to believe it; it simply has no bearing on their lives. That is one issue. However, the past few decades there has been this attempt to, yes, “accept Scripture for what it actually says” regarding homosexuality, yet these interpreters have attempted to redefine what it says, for instance, by saying, “Well, Scripture always refers to homosexuality in regards to lust and going against a person’s ‘individual nature’.” What they mean is this: Scripture does not condemn homosexuality per se, it only condemns the act of a heterosexual committing homosexual acts, because that would be against the heterosexual’s nature. The reverse is thus also true: it is also sinful for someone who is a homosexual “by nature” to commit heterosexual acts. This interpretation is particularly apple to Romans 1:24-27, but is this really what this passage is about? Let’s take a look.

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Same-Sex Marriage is Now Legal: So What’s the Problem?

Undoubtedly the internet has blown up with the news of the legalization of same-sex marriage in all 50 states. Even now as I write this post there is a rainbow banner going across my administration page for this blog. People in the Church now have many questions regarding the safety of their congregations from the seemingly relentless flood of anti-Christianity sweeping our nation inch by inch. These are important issues, but I just have some thoughts about how we as Christians need to react at this moment in time, because I feel like many are missing the mark, frankly. The turth is, many Christians, and especially me, are struggling deeply with how to react to this situation. Briefly, here are my thoughts.

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Suffering and Evil: What should Christians do with it?

This past week, if you’ve even been remotely connected to the news or social media, you’ve heard about the tremendous act of evil that took place at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E) Church. A young white man, 21 years of age, walks into the church during a Bible study and prayer meeting, feigning participation, only later revealing a weapon and proceeding to slaughter nine people—six women and three men. Now this incident raises all sorts of concerns. What does this mean about race relations in America? Should we do something about guns? What about carry permits? However, since this happened in a house of worship, this raises what I believe to be the most important question: Why did this happen? There is a Biblical answer, though it is probably not what many people expect, or even like.1

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Reflections on Herman Bavinck’s “Reformed Dogmatics”, Vol. 1 – Prolegomena

This Summer I imposed on myself a reading plan to go through all four volumes of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics. For the past few weeks I have been reading through the first volume. I just finished this weekend. Though my mind is nowhere near the caliber of Bavinck’s and thus could never offer a thorough review—let alone a critique—I will do my best to give a few brief thoughts on my experience of reading this first volume.

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“Confessional” or “No Creed but Christ”?

I have spent some time scrounging around and asking folks for possible topics for this second blog post. After not really coming up with anything, I realized that I had just spent a good portion of my afternoon the other day establishing and polishing my Statement of Faith page on this blog. Now, as that page says, it is one of my firm beliefs that confessions of faith1 are crucial for the survival of the modern Church. Consequently, it is bothersome to me that there has now this day arisen a conflict between those who, like me, are confessional believers who subscribe to creeds and confessions and those who are increasingly skeptical of confessions of faith and thus subscribe to none. So, in this blog post, I will look through and address the pros and cons of each position—both biblically and practically (not that Scripture is impractical)—and, in the end, attempt to defend my belief that confessions are crucial for the Church and ought to be used without reservation.

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